Leaving digital footprint, one tweet at a time

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By Sydnee Hertle

Every character, every picture, every Tweet, posted, uploaded and published impacts everyone who views it.

According to Live Internet Statistics, every second about 6,000 Tweets are published, adding up to about 350 million Tweets sent a day. It is safe to say Twitter is collecting a considerable amount of information.

Senior Troy Kramer, self-proclaimed social media guru, said he believes “posting too much is both annoying and downright embarrassing.”

Senior Carly Lambertus said she isn’t as passionate about the subject as Kramer, yet “if you don’t like something someone posts, you can unfollow them.”

Social media can be a tool of prosperity, networking, and exchange, if used correctly.

Yet, some question if people are abusing and overusing the resource that is social media.

It sometimes feels like there is no such thing as social media etiquette. Are there unwritten rules of the web?

Senior Matthew Rosellini said he hopes “there is or else it would be really really annoying.”

Just how much of this information is saved and can be held against users? This information can follow people to their future job or collegiate interviews and always be available for further research.

Privacy is never really guaranteed. It seems to be the popular opinion that privacy is up to the person.

Rossellini said, “If you don’t put it on social media, you can stay private.” Kramer agrees with this: “People give away their own privacy.” Nothing is guaranteed, that is why monitoring exactly what one uploads or posts is so critical.

Even colleges are monitoring social media mentions by applicants. According to The New York Times, when published material relates to colleges, they reserve the right to monitor potential applicants online.

Mr. Scott Meiklejohn, dean of admissions at Bowdoin College “wondered about the judgment of someone who spends their time on their mobile phone and makes such awful remarks.”

A critical example of this is the app Snapchat. Snapchat is a popular way of communicating by quickly sending pictures that delete after 10 seconds. On the issue of privacy, Snapchat has the ability to save all snaps sent.

According to the privacy policy, Snapchat also reserves the right to “share information about you (users) with service providers who perform services on our (Snapchat’s) behalf.”

Snapchat’s privacy policy also states that all snaps are eventually deleted from servers, but they cannot control the people receiving these pictures.

If someone is sending personal photographs, the person receiving these photos has the ability to permanently store and save these photographs.

Likewise, teachers have the ability to research what a student is posting about, simply by checking their Twitter.

With these new horizons, student must decide how much of a digital footprint they want to leave.